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Researcher's Profile

Lecturer

Genta NAGAE

Genome Science

E-mail: nagaeg-tky.umin.ac.jp

Tel: 03-5452-5235

FAX: 03-5452-5355

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Biography

2000.03
Medical School, The University of Tokyo (UTokyo)
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2000.05
Junior Resident, The University of Tokyo Hospital
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2001.06
Junior Resident, NTT Medical Center Tokyo
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2002.06
Senior Resident, Jichi Medical University Hospital
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2008.03
Medical Doctors Graduate, UTokyo
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2008.04
Project Researcher, RCAST, UTokyo
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2010.10
Research Associate, RCAST, UTokyo
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2015.10
Project Lecturer, RCAST, UTokyo
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2017.07
Lecturer, RCAST, UTokyo

Research Interests

The human body is composed of hundreds of diverse cell types and their distinct patterns of gene expression are tightly regulated by epigenetic modifications. Disruption of these regulatory systems is frequently observed in human diseases. Notably, epigenomic disruptions as well as genomic aberrations are deeply associated with cancer development. We would like to approach the mechanism of why epigenomic networks are dysregulated and they may result in disease, for basic research and translational medicine.

1. Profiling the epigenomic information of cancer cells
We are analyzing variable patterns of cancer methylome and studying the aberrant methylations that are associated with biological behaviors of cancer.

2. Understanding how to alter the dynamics of cytosine modification
Epigenetic modifiers are often dysregulated in human cancer. We would like to uncover the landscape of dysregulated networks in cancer cells.

3. Performing epigenetic analysis from the limited number of cells
We are trying to profile the covalent modifications of cytosine (WGBS, TAB-seq) and of histone tails (ChIP-seq), chromatin accessibility and chromatin interactions to elucidate epigenetic heterogeneity during cellular differentiation and cancer development.


Keywords

Epigenetics, DNA methylation, Cancer, Translational research

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