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Intelligent Cooperative Systems Kanzaki Laboratory

Reconstruction, understanding, and application of highly evolved sensory function, brain mechanisms, and behavioral strategies of insects

Whole insect brain simulation and the understanding of insect intelligence

Our target is the understanding of insect intelligence through largescale simulation of the insect brain that contains 104-106 neurons. To unravel mechanisms of information processing of insect brains, we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches. The properties of individual neurons and neural circuits are investigated with morphological, electrophysiological, and functional imaging techniques in conjunction with behavioral experiments that set a context for interpretation and meaning. Such data are used to reconstruct connections between neurons and to develop a large-scale neural network model. We employ the Fugaku or other supercomputer for model simulation and this allows us to replay activities in insect brains in real time.

Development of odor biosensors based on insect olfaction

Insects have sophisticated olfactory systems that detect odorant molecules in the air with high sensitivity. We have successfully reconstructed the functions of several insect-derived odorant receptors in cultured insect cells and olfactory receptor neurons of silkmoths using genetic engineering. By applying these technologies, we aim to develop a “sensor cells” for visualizing various odorant molecules as fluorescence, and a “sensor moth” for finding an odor source on demand.

Insect antenna-hybrid small drone for efficient odor source localization

Insect antennae work as excellent sensors for detecting odorant molecules in the air with high sensitivity, selectivity, and real-time ability. We developed a small autonomous bio-hybrid drone with a mounted silkmoth antenna for detecting odorant molecules in the air and localizing their source. The development of a programmable and efficient flight platform for odor source localization is advanced through the combination of silkmoth antennae as excellent odorant sensors and a highly maneuverable small drone.

Reconstruction of the insect brain
Reconstruction of the insect brain
Measurement results of a cell-based sensor chip
Measurement results of a cell-based sensor chip
The bio-hybrid drone with a mounted silkmoth antenna for odor source localization.
The bio-hybrid drone with a mounted silkmoth antenna for odor source localization.

Member

  • Ryohei KANZAKI
  • Specialized field:Neuroethology, Biohybrid system
Project Associate Professor Hidefumi MITSUNO
Project Research Associate Stephan Shuichi HAUPT
Project Research Associate Daigo TERUTSUKI

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