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Researcher's Profile

Project Lecturer
Shigeru SHIBATA

Clinical Epigenetics

E-mail: ssiba-tkyumin.ac.jp

Tel: 03-5452-5072

Biography

1999. 03   MD, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo (UTokyo) 
2007. 03   PhD, Graduate School of Medicine, UTokyo 
2009. 04   Postdoctoral research fellow of JSPS 
2013. 02   Associate Research Scientist, Department of Genetics, Yale School of Medicine 
2014. 04   Associate professor, Division of Nephrology, Department of Internal Medicine, Teikyo
                University 
2014. 05   Project lecturer, RCAST, UTokyo

Research Interests

Protein interactions and post-translational modifications (PTMs) play key roles in maintaining homeostasis through tightly regulating protein activity. Our research focus is to clarify the pathogenic roles of these mechanisms in hypertension and chronic kidney diseases (CKD). We have identified signaling interaction between nuclear receptor mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and small GTPase Rac1 in kidney, which triggers MR over-activity and leads to salt-sensitive hypertension (Shibata et al. Nat Med 2008; Shibata et al. J Clin Invest 2011). We have also demonstrated that phosphorylation at ligand-binding domain in MR regulates ligand binding and signaling in a cell-selective manner (Figure 1; Shibata et al. Cell Metab 2013). These findings identified a new machinery regulating nuclear receptor activity, have provided insights into the mechanisms how kidneys respond to different environmental challenges, and identified novel pathways resulting in hypertension. Ongoing and future projects also include the role of ubiquitination and histone modification in fluid and electrolyte homeostasis.

Keyword

Post-translational modification, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, nuclear receptor, protein-protein interaction


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