Researcher's Profile

  • Project Lecturer
  • Satori TSUZUKI
  • Mathematical Physics of Emergent Systems
E-mail
tsuzukisatorig.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp
URL

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Biography

March 2011 Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology (BS)
March 2013 Department of Energy Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (MS)
April 2014 Research Fellowship for Young Scientists of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS DC2)
March 2016 Department of Energy Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Dr.Sci)
April 2016 Postdoctoral Research Fellowship for Young Scientists of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS PD)
July 2017 Project Resarch Associate, RCAST, The University of Tokyo (UTokyo)
April 2020 JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowship for Research Abroad
April 2021 Project Lecturer, RCAST, UTokyo

Research Interests

Do you understand the field of "computational science?" If an applied mathematician says, "Similar relationships can be observed in various nonlinear physical phenomena, and some of them can be described by partial differential equation (PDE)," I am sure you would agree that it is reasonable. Basically, computational scientists are similar to applied mathematicians; however, computational scientists also investigate how to embody the mathematical relationship (reformulating them into discretized forms) to enable computers to reproduce the target phenomena. Some computational scientists abstract and simulate only critical factors from physical or social systems. In other cases, the dynamics of atoms and molecules comprising a system are accurately reproduced and directly calculated on parallel-computing platforms such as supercomputers. In this way, computational scientists pursue scientific truth and propose solutions for social problems by finding and modeling the governing laws of a system, developing mathematical and computational algorithms, and maximizing the use of high-quality visualization technology, data science, and mathematical analysis. My research interest spans a wide range of areas pertaining to computational science involving PDEs. In particular, I specialize in the development and application of particle methods such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH).
Computational science, which is considered to overlap the fields of mathematics, science and engineering, and computer science, can solve problems in various fields. I will contribute to society by performing fundamental and interdisciplinary research, aiming to create "intellectual excitement" for a new era.

Award

  • June 2017 "MSC Special Award," of the Graphics Awards at the 22th JSCES annual conference
  • June 2017 “First Place,” of the Graphics Awards at the 22th JSCES annual conference
  • March 2016 “Best Student Paper Award,” at the International Conference Violent Flows 2016
  • June 2015 “Visual Computing Award,” of the Graphics Awards at the 20th JSCES annual conference
  • March 2015 “Best Paper Award,” HPCS IEEE Computer Society Japan Chapter
  • March 2015 IEEE Computer Society Japan Chapter Young Researcher Award
  • December 2014 “Grand Prize,” of the Best CFD Graphics Award at the 28th CFD Symposium (animation section)
  • June 2014 “Best Performance Award,” of the Graphics Awards at the 22th JSCES annual conference
  • May 2014 JSME Fellow Award for Outstanding Young Engineers
  • October 2012 IPSJ Computer Science Research Award for Young Scientists

Keywords

Computational sciences, computational fluid dynamics, mathematical physics, large-scale particle simulations

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