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Climate Science Research Nakamura Laboratory

Understanding formation and variability of the climate system and extreme weather through big data analysis and diversified numerical simulations

Deciphering Earth's climate system from a viewpoint of ocean-atmosphere interactions

Earth’s atmosphere and ocean interact mutually to form the climate system and make it vary. Natural variability of the system arising from its internal chaotic processes is superimposed on long-term climate change in responding to external forcing typified by anthropogenic increase of greenhouse gasses. We study both the natural variability and climate change, which is thus necessary for deepening our understanding of extreme weather events and future climate change both exerting significant impacts on our society.

We utilize observational data of the climate system. History of the evolving climatic state is recorded as global three-dimensional distributions of atmospheric variables such as winds, temperature, humidity, precipitation and cloudiness, and of ocean currents, water temperature, salinity, ice/snow cover and heat and moisture exchange between the atmosphere and ocean as well. Thus we have to handle the “big data”. Numerical simulations with ocean/ atmosphere models are necessary not only for future projection of the climate system but also for deepening our understanding of complex interactive processes in the climate system. Ensemble simulations with a large number of model time integrations with slightly modified initial conditions under the particular boundary conditions and/or external forcing are highly effective in clarifying mixed causality behind the climate variability and extreme weather events and assessing their predictability. We utilize the outputs of those simulations as “big data” for “virtual Earth”.

We explore mechanisms and predictability of various phenomena occurring in our climate system with various spatiotemporal scales, by applying statistical analyses and theoretical diagnoses and by performing purpose-oriented diversified numerical simulations.

Wavy pressure anomalies caused a heat wave to Japan in August 2010
Wavy pressure anomalies caused a heat wave to Japan in August 2010
Active air-sea interaction along Kuroshio and Gulf Stream
Active air-sea interaction along Kuroshio and Gulf Stream
Arctic sea ice reduction cools Asia in winter
Arctic sea ice reduction cools Asia in winter

Member

  • Hisashi NAKAMURA
  • Specialized field:Dynamics for climate variability and extreme weather, air-sea interaction
Research Associate Masato MORI
Project Research Associate Takafumi MIYASAKA
<As of May 2020>

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